island of Lipari

having a 37.6 km square area, and it is 24 nautical miles far from the Sicilian coast

maps of Lipari

It is the largest of the Aeolian archipelago’s islands, having a 37.6 km square area, and it is 24 nautical miles far from the Sicilian coast. Its inhabitants, called Liparesi or Liparoti, are approximately 8980 in number, and are located in the town of Lipari as well as in the small villages of the island: Canneto, Acquacalda, Quattropani and Pianoconte. With the exception of Salina, all the other islands depend on Lipari administratively.

Like all the Aeolian archipelago, Lipari has volcanic origins. The most ancient part of Lipari is the western one, where between 160 thousand and 1340 thousand years ago, 12 stratified volcanos came to life, among them Monte delle Felci, Timponi, Monte Rosa, etc. After this intense eruptive period, a long pause in volcanic activity followed.
During the second period, about 100 thousand years ago, the stratified volcano Monte S. Angelo formed. The volcanoes of the third period (40 thousand to 8 thousand years ago) erupted pumice and formed a range of peaks, such as Monte Guardia and Monte Giardina.

The eruptive activity restarted after a long pause on the north-east side with the explosion of enormous quantities of pumice which formed Monte Pelato, and with the emission of the obsidian fall of Rocche Rosse (1200 years ago). Even during the historic era, pumice eruptions covered the Roman remains of Contrada Diana and Lipari Acropolis in the Ivth and Vth century A.D.
Examples of the last spectacular volcanic activities abound: you can still see harmless fumaroles and spa springs, as well as large quantities of pumice and obsidian.